Why publish FOAF

This document briefly describes what data we want to publish and why FOAF might or might not be the right format to publish this kind of data.

Contents:

1. The Use Cases

TODO

2. The Data

These use cases require information about researchers other than the current user of the VRE and research groups other than those that the current user is directly or indirectly involved with and requires than this information is available to the

To

From

Examples

Fields

Researcher

Personal details

name, email, phone no, website, blog, RSS feed, ...

Researcher

Researcher

peer, supervisor, ...

relationship

Researcher

Document

book, research paper, ...

document URL, bibliography URL, ISBN, ...

Researcher

Institution

is-part-of

Researcher

Research group

is-member-of

Researcher

Profession body

IEEE, ACM, ...

is-member-of

Researcher

Participatory Community

flickr, /., Wikipedia, ...

username, website, RSS feed, ...

Research group

Institution

is-part-of

Research group

Topic of study

keyword, URL

Research group

Contact details

email, phone no, website, RSS feed, ...

Institution

Contact details

email, phone no, website, RSS feed, ...

Profession body

Contact details

email, website, RSS feed, ...

Participatory Community

Details

website, blog, RSS feed, ...

Some of these details, particularly the personal details of the researcher require explicit informed consent before they are TODO

3. FOAF basics

FOAF is a flavour of RDF for describing individuals and groups and the relationships between them.

Encoding this information in RDF means that all information is optional. Users need not give out any personal information if they wish to publish information about their research group and institution.

FOAF has special handling to keep email addresses from spammers.

4. Advantages of FOAF

5. Disadvantages of FOAF

6. References


-- StuartYeates 2006-10-03 20:52:38

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OSS Watch is funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) and is situated within the Research Technologies Service (RTS) of the University of Oxford.