Web application framework notes

This page collects links and notes for tools and frameworks to construct web applications.

Contents:

1. Traditional Java frameworks and components

(And many other packages, some commercial, including WebSphere, WebLogic, JavaServer Faces, ... )

2. Rapid web application development

This list is far from complete; it consists of frameworks I've given (barely) more than passing consideration for performing rapid web application development, and notes features that I felt were significant -- GrahamKlyne

See also:

2.1. Lightweight framework comparisons

2.1.1. Python/TurboGears and Ruby/Rails

2.1.2. Python frameworks

2.2. Notes from using specific frameworks

(Acknowledgement: the initial list is copied here from a posting by Alistair Bayley to the Haskell-cafe discussion list.)

One of the first people (but not the only, I think) to recognise that continuations were a good way of modelling web interations was Christian Queinnec:

Probably the best-known such framework is Seaside (ironic, as Smalltalk doesn't natively support continuations, AFAIK):

Phil Wadler is also doing something along these lines in Links, I believe:

Excellent summary of problems with REST and continuations (Dave Roberts):

IBM article, mainly about Cocoon - a Java + Javascript framework:

More hype:

Bill Clementson's postings (he's a Lisper):

  1. Dependency Injection is a design pattern in which linkage between software components is managed by framework code outside those components, rather than by the components themselves. See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dependency_injection, http://www.theserverside.com/articles/article.tss?l=IOCBeginners, http://www.martinfowler.com/articles/injection.html.

  2. POJO: Plain Old Java Object. See also: http://www.martinfowler.com/bliki/POJO.html, http://www.onjava.com/pub/a/onjava/2005/06/29/spring-ejb3.html


-- GrahamKlyne 2006-07-25 15:10:17

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